Your Options


OPTION: ABORTION

You Have A Right To Know The Facts About Abortion

Abortion is not just a simple medical procedure. For many women, it is a life changing event with significant physical, emotional, and spiritual consequences. Most women who struggle with past abortions say that they wish they had been told all the facts about abortion.2  

 Complications of Abortion

“In medical practice, there are few surgical procedures given so little attention and so underrated in its potential hazards as abortion. It is a commonly held view that complications are inevitable.” - Abortionist Warren Hern4


Short-Term Medical Risks of Abortion
 
  • Pelvic Infection (Sepsis)
 
  • Incomplete Abortion
 
  • Blood Clots in the Uterus
 
  • Heavy Bleeding (Hemorrhage)
 
  • Cut or Torn Cervix
 
  • Perforation of the Uterus Wall
 
  • Anesthesia-Related Complications3
Long-Term Medical Risks of Abortion
  • Complications associated with an abortion may make it difficult to become pregnant in the future or carry a pregnancy to term. 
  • Women who have a strong family history of breast cancer or who have clinical findings of breast disease should seek medical advice from their physician regardless of their decision to become pregnant or have an abortion. 3
  • Post abortion syndrome;  depression, suicide, eating disorders, alcohol/drug addition, emotional instability with anger, guilt, regret, denial of your emotions or the abortion, inability to form relationships with people, difficulty bonding with future children.
Abortion Is Not Your Only Choice

You need not face this problem alone. There are people who care about you and your baby------people who will help you in this time of desperate need. 4

 ADOPTION
ABORTION
SimilaritiesYou can pursue earlier goals and plans.

You can live independently.

You will not have to parent prematurely.

You will be free from the financial burdens of parenting.

You will have the freedom to choose if you want to have a long-term relationship with the baby’s father.

You can resume your education or career.
You can pursue earlier goals and plans.

You can live independently.

You will not have to parent prematurely.

You will be free from the financial burdens of parenting.

You will have the freedom to choose if you want to have a long-term relationship with the baby’s father.

You can resume your education or career.

Differences
Your pregnancy ends with giving life.

You may feel good and positive about your choice.

You will remember giving birth.

You will have plenty of time to plan your and your baby’s future.

You can hold, name, and love your baby.

You can have continued contact with your child.

Your pregnancy ends with death.

You may feel guilt and shame about your choice.

You will remember taking a life.

Abortion is final; you can’t reverse your decision.

You will never know or treasure your baby.

You will miss the opportunity to see your child develop.


OPTION: ADOPTION


1. How can adoption be good for my baby and me?

If you are not ready to be a parent, you can still give your baby the gift of life by choosing adoption. You can plan for your baby’s future by selecting a stable, loving family to care for your baby. After birth, you can see your baby, name your baby, and spend time with your baby. If you so choose, you may be able to get updates on your child’s progress and have ongoing visits throughout your child’s life while you continue your education or career goals. Finally, you can be proud that you chose life for your baby.

2. Can I choose a family for my baby?

Yes! Most agencies have adoptive couples who come from a variety of backgrounds, and they have been screened and approved. There are additional options such as choosing a friend, or someone who has been recommended to you. Your agency will discuss these options with you.

3. How much contact can I have with my baby after birth and after adoption?

You may have as much contact with your baby at the hospital as you desire. When planning your child’s adoption, you can choose an open adoption plan that allows ongoing visits with your child, or you can choose a less open adoption that keeps you informed about your child’s progress through letters and photos. Adoptive families respect your need to know that your child is loved and happy. If you prefer not to have any ongoing contact with your child and the adoptive family, confidential adoption plans are also possible. 

4. How soon after birth does my baby go to the parents I choose?

The timing of your child’s placement depends on three factors:
    • Your preference for the timing of placement.
    • Legal aspects of the adoption, which may vary from state to state.
    • The cooperation of the birthfather.
Many birthmothers want their baby placed with the adoptive family directly from the hospital. Some women prefer to place their baby in temporary care while they consider their adoption decision. Your agency can help with either option.

5. How much will my child know about me?

That depends on what type of option plan you choose: open, semi-open, or confidential. Your agency will encourage you to provide your complete medical and social history for your child, no matter what type of adoption plan you make, and in some states, that is required. You may choose to share your identity and where you live with the adoptive family. If you’ve made an open adoption plan, you may have ongoing, direct contact with your child and the adoptive family. The information your child will know about the birthfather depends on his relationship with you and your counselor. Most birthfathers give their complete medical and social history, recognizing how important it is for the child. In some cases, the only information available about the birthfather is what the birthmother provides.

6. What rights does the birthfather have?
 
Both you and the birthfather have rights. If you disagree about adoption or you no longer have a relationship with him, your agency will work with the birthfather and/or the courts to determine if his rights can be terminated. However, in Minnesota there is a Putative Father's Adoption Registry that gives them the option to register and participate in decisions regarding the adoption from conception until 30 days after birth.

7. Can my child find me if he or she wants to search someday?

The law in your state determines when and how your child may access the information in the adoption file. Your caseworker will explain the current laws as they apply to your adoption plan.

8. How can I be sure my child will be well cared for?

Adoptive families approved by your agency must meet standards that are shared with you. Your agency will make every attempt to complete a thorough assessment of potential adoptive families. Prior to finalizing the adoption, a caseworker will make home visits to ensure the child’s well-being. In an open adoption, you will see for yourself how well your child is cared for and how much your child is loved.

9. Do I need an attorney or do I pay my agency to assist me with the adoption?

You do not need an attorney and there are no costs to you. The adoption agency will handle all the legal details for you and the birthfather.

10. Does the adoption agency offer assistance with medical and living expenses while I am making an adoption plan?

Assistance with medical and living expenses is available through many agencies. For details about how your agency can help you in your particular circumstances, contact your caseworker.2

1. How can adoption be good for my baby and me?

If you are not ready to be a parent, you can still give your baby the gift of life by choosing adoption. You can plan for your baby’s future by selecting a stable, loving family to care for your baby. After birth, you can see your baby, name your baby, and spend time with your baby. If you so choose, you may be able to get updates on your child’s progress and have ongoing visits throughout your child’s life while you continue your education or career goals. Finally, you can be proud that you chose life for your baby.

2. Can I choose a family for my baby?

Yes! Most agencies have adoptive couples who come from a variety of backgrounds, and they have been screened and approved. There are additional options such as choosing a friend, or someone who has been recommended to you. Your agency will discuss these options with you.

3. How much contact can I have with my baby after birth and after adoption?

You may have as much contact with your baby at the hospital as you desire. When planning your child’s adoption, you can choose an open adoption plan that allows ongoing visits with your child, or you can choose a less open adoption that keeps you informed about your child’s progress through letters and photos. Adoptive families respect your need to know that your child is loved and happy. If you prefer not to have any ongoing contact with your child and the adoptive family, confidential adoption plans are also possible. 

4. How soon after birth does my baby go to the parents I choose?

The timing of your child’s placement depends on three factors:
    • Your preference for the timing of placement.
    • Legal aspects of the adoption, which may vary from state to state.
    • The cooperation of the birthfather.
Many birthmothers want their baby placed with the adoptive family directly from the hospital. Some women prefer to place their baby in temporary care while they consider their adoption decision. Your agency can help with either option.

5. How much will my child know about me?

That depends on what type of option plan you choose: open, semi-open, or confidential. Your agency will encourage you to provide your complete medical and social history for your child, no matter what type of adoption plan you make, and in some states, that is required. You may choose to share your identity and where you live with the adoptive family. If you’ve made an open adoption plan, you may have ongoing, direct contact with your child and the adoptive family. The information your child will know about the birthfather depends on his relationship with you and your counselor. Most birthfathers give their complete medical and social history, recognizing how important it is for the child. In some cases, the only information available about the birthfather is what the birthmother provides.

6. What rights does the birthfather have?
 
Both you and the birthfather have rights. If you disagree about adoption or you no longer have a relationship with him, your agency will work with the birthfather and/or the courts to determine if his rights can be terminated. However, in Minnesota there is a Putative Father's Adoption Registry that gives them the option to register and participate in decisions regarding the adoption from conception until 30 days after birth.

7. Can my child find me if he or she wants to search someday?

The law in your state determines when and how your child may access the information in the adoption file. Your caseworker will explain the current laws as they apply to your adoption plan.

8. How can I be sure my child will be well cared for?

Adoptive families approved by your agency must meet standards that are shared with you. Your agency will make every attempt to complete a thorough assessment of potential adoptive families. Prior to finalizing the adoption, a caseworker will make home visits to ensure the child’s well-being. In an open adoption, you will see for yourself how well your child is cared for and how much your child is loved.

9. Do I need an attorney or do I pay my agency to assist me with the adoption?

You do not need an attorney and there are no costs to you. The adoption agency will handle all the legal details for you and the birthfather.

10. Does the adoption agency offer assistance with medical and living expenses while I am making an adoption plan?

Assistance with medical and living expenses is available through many agencies. For details about how your agency can help you in your particular circumstances, contact your caseworker.2
 (Bethany Christian Services. www.bethany.org)


ADOPTION AND PARENTING DIFFERENCES AND SIMILARITIES


SIMILARITIES 
ADOPTION PARENTING1
You have the joy of knowing you chose life for your child.

You have the joy of knowing you chose life for your child.
You will have plenty of time to plan your and your baby’s future.

You will have plenty of time to plan your and your baby’s future.
You can hold, name, and love your baby.

You can hold, name, and love your baby.
You can know how your child is growing and developing.

You can know how your child is growing and developing.
Your child can thank you for the life you chose for him or her.

Your child can thank you for the life you chose for him or her.

 
DIFFERENCES 
ADOPTION
PARENTING1
You will not have to parent before you are ready.

You may be parenting before you are ready.
You will be free from the full-time responsibility of parenting.

You will have the full-time responsibIlity of parenting.
You can choose a family for your baby.

You may have to look to your extended family for support.
You can continue with your goals for your education or career.

You may need to delay your goals for your education or career.
You will have the freedom to choose if you want a long-term relationship with the baby’s father.

You may be involved in a long-term relationship with the baby’s father.
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Sources Cited
1. Adoption & Abortion: Differences and Similarities. (1997). Bethany Christian Services. www.bethany.org
2. Before You Decide. (2003). Care Net
3. If You Are Pregnant: Information on Fetal Development, Abortion and Alternatives. (2004). Minnesota Department of Health. www.health.state.mn.us
4. Schieber, M. E., You Have A Right To Know. (2001). Easton Publishing Company, Inc. www.eastonpublishing.com